Some of the “Evidence” Against Michael Jackson in “Leaving Neverland” May Have Been Wrong

The evidence against MICHAEL JACKSON in the HBO documentary “Leaving Neverland” was pretty damning.  But apparently, some of it WASN’T TRUE.

Michael Jackson with two fans at the Kahala Hilton Hotel. Photograph by Alan Light, early February 1988

A guy named Mike Smallcombe, who once wrote a biography of Michael, found two contradictions in the testimony of alleged victims James Safechuck and Wade Robson.

Safechuck claims Michael abused him between 1988 and 1992, and he was 14 the last time it happened.  He also says he was abused in the upstairs room of the train station at the Neverland Ranch.

But Smallcombe has permits that show the train station wasn’t approved for construction until September of 1993, and didn’t open until early 1994, when Safechuck was 16.

The director of “Leaving Neverland”, a guy named Dan Reed, isn’t disputing this.  But he says, quote, “The date they have wrong is the end of the abuse.”

In other words, the director is suggesting Michael abused Safechuck until he was 16.  But the documentary says Michael groomed young boys, discarding them when they hit puberty in favor of younger ones.

Sexually abusing a 16-year-old is still a horrific crime, but it’s a different M.O. than the one presented in that documentary.

The second contradiction comes from the testimony of Wade Robson.  In the documentary, he says he stayed at Neverland with Michael in 1990, while the rest of his family went to the Grand Canyon.  And that’s when Michael abused him.

But . . . back when Michael was facing child molestation charges in the early ’90s, Wade’s mother testified in a deposition that the WHOLE FAMILY took that trip to the Grand Canyon . . . including Wade.  She said the same thing in 2016.

And in Michael’s 2005 trial, Wade told the court that he’d never been to Neverland without his mother until 1992 or 1993.  Of course, in 2005, Wade was still DEFENDING Michael against molestation claims.

Dan Reed has yet to comment on this second discrepancy.

(Bro Bible)