Is Music Getting Faster Because Streaming Makes It Easier to Skip Songs?

Is Music Getting Faster Because Streaming Makes It Easier to Skip Songs?

Is music streaming already having an effect on how songs are composed? Maybe. A new study found that the average tempo of pop music is FASTER now, possibly because our attention spans have become shorter.

The researchers looked at the year-end Top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 charts between 1986 and 2015. And in addition to the tempo, they also found that vocals in songs are starting sooner.

In 1986, it took roughly 23 seconds for the vocals to kick in . . . but in 2015, they started within the first five seconds. That’s a drop of 78%, which seems significant.

The study said, quote, “It makes sense that if the environment is so competitive, artists would want to try to grab your attention as quickly as possible . . . [and] the voice is one of the most attention-grabbing things that there is.”

A previous study of Spotify listening habits found that 21% of songs get skipped over in the first five seconds. And if you think about it, music formats are making it increasingly easy to skip songs . . . from albums, to cassettes, to CDs, and now individual songs.

Taylor Swift Scolded Apple Music for Not Paying Artists, and Apple Caved

Taylor Swift Scolded Apple Music for Not Paying Artists, and Apple Caved

Taylor Swift Scolded Apple Music for Not Paying Artists, and Apple Caved

Taylor Swift Scolded Apple Music for Not Paying Artists, and Apple Caved

Earlier this month, Apple announced Apple Music, a streaming service that would cost $9.99 a month after a three-month free trial. But during that introductory period, artists, writers, and producers would NOT be paid.

TAYLOR SWIFT didn’t like that. She announced that her new album “1989” wouldn’t be on the service, and scolded Apple in an “open letter” on her website.

She said, quote, “I find it to be shocking, disappointing, and completely unlike this historically progressive and generous company . . . three months is a long time to go unpaid, and it is unfair to ask anyone to work for nothing.

“We don’t ask you for free iPhones. Please don’t ask us to provide you with our music for no compensation.” She said she isn’t speaking up as a, quote, “spoiled, petulant child,” but for the smaller artists who are struggling to make ends meet.

And last night, someone from Apple said they’d changed their minds . . . Tweeting, quote, “Apple Music WILL pay artists for streaming, even during customers’ free trial period. We hear you Taylor and indie artists. Love, Apple.”

(Taylor’s whole letter is on her Tumblr page, here.  It’s pretty well-written, although she seems careful not to attack Apple TOO viciously, since she apparently likes that their goal is for paid streaming.)

If You Buy the New iPhone, Expect Your Cell Phone Bill to Go Way Up

If You Buy the New iPhone, Expect Your Cell Phone Bill to Go Way Up

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Today’s the day Apple FINALLY announces the new iPhone . . . so we can all finally breathe again, and for a moment all will be right with the world.

Time to put a damper on the announcement. If you get the new iPhone, your cell phone bill is probably going to shoot WAY up.

Chetan Sherma is a telecommunications analyst and consultant . . . and he says that with every new generation of iPhone, the amount of data people use doubles.

The average iPhone user goes through 1.4 gigabytes of data on their phone every month right now.

That means if you get an iPhone 6, it should jump to almost three gigabytes . . . and that’s going to be a big price jump at pretty much any cell phone carrier.

If you’re wondering how you go through that much data, it’s easy . . . streaming video takes a TON of it. Watching an hour of Netflix in HD can use a few gigabytes.

(Huffington Post)