If You Eat 155 Fun Size Snickers Today, You Will Die

If You Eat 155 Fun Size Snickers Today, You Will Die

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Halloween Candy – Snickers

It’s two days after Halloween, and unless you let your kids run wild, that means there’s still a giant pile of halloween candy in your house. Which begs the question: Should you eat it ALL?

Well . . . as much as I hate to stand in the way of that plan, you probably shouldn’t. Or you will die.

According to the American Chemical Society, you can die from a SUGAR OVERDOSE if you eat 13.5 grams of sugar for every pound of your body weight in one sitting.

The average American man weighs 195.5 pounds. So if you eat 251 Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, 155 fun size Snickers, or 102 fun size packages of M&Ms, you’ve got a chance of dropping dead.

The average American woman weighs 166.2 pounds. So you could die if you eat 214 Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, 132 fun size Snickers, or 86 fun size packages of M&Ms.

(Los Angeles Times)

 

Well that sucks; Your Packages Are About to Be Wrapped in Bubble Wrap That Doesn’t Pop

Well that sucks; Your Packages Are About to Be Wrapped in Bubble Wrap That Doesn’t Pop

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Everything you once loved is eventually ruined. Nothing ever changes for the better. Life is just empty darkness. Sorry, where was I . . .

Sealed Air Corp. is the company that makes Bubble Wrap, and they’re about to start selling a version that YOU CAN’T POP. They gave it a horrible name, too: iBubble Wrap.

Its bubbles are part of a chain and they aren’t individually inflated, so you can’t pop them.

Sealed Air will sell the stuff UNINFLATED, and companies will have to pay about $5,500 for a pump that inflates it.

But it’ll save Sealed Air a lot of money, and over time it will save those companies money because this stuff will be cheaper than old-fashioned Bubble Wrap.

It’ll also be good for the companies like Amazon because the uninflated wrap takes up less space in their warehouses . . . and they can use that extra room to stock more products.

Traditional Bubble Wrap will still be on sale . . . but you can expect that pretty soon, a lot of the packages you get will use this new version.

(Gizmodo)

Buyer Beware! Three Ways Companies Trick You Into Buying Stuff

Buyer Beware! Three Ways Companies Trick You Into Buying Stuff

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You probably know a lot of the ways companies trick you into buying stuff . . . like making something 49.99 instead of $50. But here are three tricks you might NOT know about.

1. They put things in tall, skinny packages. In most cases, they could fit the same product in a short, wide package. But studies have found that when we see a tall, narrow box, we automatically think there’s more in it.

2. They CLAIM something’s cheap, and we believe it. In a 2007 study, researchers offered overnight shipping for “a $5 fee.” Then they changed the ad so it said “a SMALL $5 fee” . . . and suddenly 20% more people were interested.

3. Price anchoring. That’s the term they use when they put a price on something that’s way higher than they EVER planned on selling it for.

Like at a clothing store, you might see a tag that says the “original” price was $56. But in reality, the store NEVER sold it for that price. They just put it on there, because then you see $32 and think it’s a DEAL.