Kid Makes $1,500 a Night Eating Dinner in Front of His Webcam

Kid Makes $1,500 a Night Eating Dinner in Front of His Webcam

How do people luck into jobs like this? There’s a 14-year-old kid in South Korea who goes by the name B.J. PATOO, and he makes up to $1,500 a night just by eating at his computer.

There’s a phenomenon over there called “mukbang”, which literally translates as, “eating broadcast”. (It’s pronounced “muck-bong.”)

It’s pretty simple: You just sit in front of your webcam and chat with people . . . while eating large quantities of food, sometimes very LOUDLY.

Patoo is one of the most popular mukbangers . . . if that’s a word . . . which is why he makes so much. It all comes from fans, who “gift” him things called “Star Balloons” that cost about ten cents each. And most of his fans are teenagers.

A lot of them say they watch because it’s entertaining, which is weird . . .

Other people say it helps them satisfy their cravings without actually eating . . . which is probably weirder, because when was the last time you turned on the Food Network, and then DIDN’T want to eat everything in your fridge?

Anyway, “Business Insider” says the mukbang kid made about 250 GRAND in 2013 . . . which really makes you wonder why you paid so much for that college diploma.

(Business Insider / ABC News / AllKPop.com)

Kid Makes $1,500 a Night

Good Guy CEO Is Paying for All His Employees’ Kids to Go to College

Good Guy CEO Is Paying for All His Employees’ Kids to Go to College

boxed

Ahem… cough cough… I hope our bosses are listening, because I could use some extra cash.

Chieh Huang is the CEO of Boxed.com . . . they sell stuff like toilet paper and laundry detergent in bulk, and mail it to you. And he recently decided to add a new perk for his employees . . . he’s going to pay for ALL of their kids to go to college.

He says he’ll cover four years of tuition for each kid, and it doesn’t matter what college they choose. There’s no cap on it, so even if they need 60 grand a year to go to Harvard, he’ll pay.

The money is coming out of his own pocket, and a few investors are pitching in. He says he doesn’t actually think of it as a perk, he just wants his employees to know he’s committed to making sure their families are taken care of.

Right now, the company has about 100 employees. And apparently most of them are pretty young, because they only have 12 kids total.

But obviously that’ll change . . . especially now that they know they can pop out as many kids as they want, and not worry about paying for their education.

(Washington Post)