Police Use an 11-Year-Old’s Drawing to Catch a Criminal

Police Use an 11-Year-Old’s Drawing to Catch a Criminal

Police Use an 11-Year-Old's Drawing to Catch a Criminal

Police Use an 11-Year-Old’s Drawing to Catch a Criminal

There was a string of burglaries recently in Stratford, Connecticut. One of them was at 11-year-old Rebecca DePietro’s house . . . and she got a quick look at the guy.

So when the cops asked her to describe him, she drew a picture. But we’re going to be harsh here . . . Rebecca is NOT a good artist. It was basically a lousy kid’s drawing of a guy with some scraggly facial hair.

But it was a lead. And when the cops compared it to one of their suspects last week, they felt like he looked close enough to the drawing that he was worth investigating.

He’s 32-year-old Pedro Bruno. And it turns out he WAS the burglar . . . because he confessed to everything.

The Stratford police chief says, quote, “For us to take that sketch and match it up, it was remarkable. Maybe she’s part of our next generation of detectives.” So they honored Rebecca in a ceremony on Thursday.

(NBC 30 – New Britain)

 

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Have Tinder/Hinge Success! 3 things that work to start a conversation

Have Tinder/Hinge Success! 3 things that work to start a conversation

best ways to start a conversation

There’s a dating app called Hinge that’s like Tinder, but only matches you up with friends-of-friends on Facebook. And they just did a study to find out the best ways to start a conversation when you’re doing online dating.

Here are three results that are kind of interesting, even if you DON’T use dating apps.

1. Guys are 98% more likely to reply to ASSERTIVE messages. Women are 40% more likely to reply to FOOD-related things, like “What’s your favorite type of cake?”

2. Men are 25% LESS likely to respond if you wait more than six hours to message them after you’re matched up. But the response rate for women only drops by 5%.

3. People over 35 are more likely to respond to messages about pop culture . . . 29-to-34-year-olds like more personal messages . . . 24-to-28-year-olds respond more to lifestyle questions and things like, “What are your plans this weekend” . . . and 18-to-23-year-olds like weird questions that catch them off guard.

The survey also tested a bunch of pre-written icebreakers to see how well they’d do.

And asking the person to respond with “Two truths and a lie” had the best response rate.

It got 31% more replies than average.

(Bustle)

Hinge – Apple | Android

Tinder – Apple | Android

Chocolate is better for you than exercise!. . . but there’s a catch

Chocolate is better for you than exercise!. . . but there’s a catch

Compound_chocolate

This is one of those stories that sounds like AMAZING news but gets less and less amazing with every detail. But that’s a spoiler . . . for a few brief, shining moments, bask in the glory of this sentence:

Chocolate is better for you than exercise!

Now that you’ve heard it . . . time to kill your dreams.

Chocolate contains a chemical compound called flavanols. Researchers at Columbia University and New York University found that a large dose of them were better for the brain than exercising.

They increased the blood flow to the brain, improved people’s memory, and made them sharper overall.

BUT . . . it took a TON of flavanols to do it. The researchers used a concentrated form of cocoa powder for the test. To get the effects at home, you’d have to eat 44 POUNDS of chocolate in a DAY.

And while that’s better for your BRAIN than exercise . . . it’s exponentially worse for your body. So . . . until we can get our hands on that concentrated cocoa powder, this study basically has no effect on our lives.

(Oxford University Press)